How To Make Scrambled Eggs

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Learn how to make creamy, flavorful scrambled eggs (the RIGHT way). Try this French-inspired method for perfect eggs every time!

Be sure to try some more of our Easy Breakfast Ideas including our Crock Pot Breakfast Casserole, Breakfast Monte Cristo Sandwiches, or our Make Ahead Breakfast Parfaits.

French style scrambled eggs in a pan with a green spatula. A carton of eggs is sitting next to the pan.

The BEST Scrambled Eggs

I’m not a huge fan of scrambled eggs. At least I wasn’t up until a few months ago. I thought that there was no technique to scrambling eggs and that they were universally supposed to bland, airy, and slightly rubbery. Then I had scrambled eggs from a French chef in French Polynesia and my mind was immediately changed. I went from merely tolerating scrambled eggs to craving them!

The chef explained that the French prefer their scrambled eggs soft and creamy, and that there is a special technique to getting them that way. According to him, every French chef knows this. In fact, Gordon Ramsay will often determine a chef’s true ability by how they prepare scrambled eggs. It takes a little bit of practice but once you get it right, you will never go back to “American” scrambled eggs… at least that’s how it is for me!

It’s A Bit Subjective

When it comes to eggs, clearly what is “best” to one may not be best to another. It comes down to preference. If you have never had French-style scrambled eggs, I urge you to just give them a try! It might take a few tries to get it just right, and thankfully it’s not expensive or time consuming to practice. Maybe after you try them you will still prefer the American way of doing them, and that’s totally ok. For me, I love the flavor and texture of French scrambled eggs. They taste so good, there’s no need to add ketchup, salsa, or even cheese.

A top view of scrambled eggs in a pan sitting on a counter.

American vs. French-Style Scrambled Eggs

American:

  • Fluffy and spongy, slightly dry
  • Less Flavor
  • Milk or water whipped into mixture (this dilutes the flavor and dulls the color)
  • Whipped vigorously to incorporate air into the mixture.
  • Eggs scrambled constantly over heat until fully cooked.
  • Pale yellow in appearance

French:

  • Creamy and velvety, slightly custard-y
  • More Flavor
  • Cold butter added before cooking
  • Beaten gently, avoiding air bubbles creating a dense mixture.
  • Eggs removed from heat when curds are forming and continue to cook after being removed from the burner.
  • If cream is added, it is always after the eggs are finished cooking.
Close up of scrambled eggs in a pan with a green spatula underneath ready to lift the eggs from the pan.

Take It To The Next Level

For even creamier eggs, gently fold in a tablespoon of crème fraîche (Gordon Ramsay style), sour cream, or heavy cream before serving.

Tips For Perfect (French-Style) Eggs

  • Don’t whip air into the eggs. When you are beating your eggs with a fork, you shouldn’t try to get lots of air bubbles. You are merely beating the eggs together, not whipping air into them.
  • Start with a cold pan. You don’t want your eggs to immediately start cooking once they hit the pan. Put them in the pan and allow to heat gradually.
  • Add some butter. This is a must. The eggs need that fat to have the creamy, smooth texture. Otherwise they will get gummy and sticky.
  • Don’t overcook. Your goal is to avoid rubbery eggs. It is best to remove them from the heat when curds start to form. If your eggs have completely solidified before taking them from the heat, you waited too long. They will continue to cook and become rubbery by the time you serve them.
  • Season at the end. Do not, I repeat, DO NOT salt your eggs before cooking. The salt will react with the eggs causing them to be firm and rubbery. Always lightly season your eggs after cooking.

More Easy Breakfast Tutorials:

Close up of scrambled eggs in a pan with a green spatula underneath ready to lift the eggs from the pan.

How To Make Scrambled Eggs

3.67 from 3 votes
Learn how to make creamy, flavorful scrambled eggs (the RIGHT way). Try this French-inspired method for perfect eggs every time!
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 5 mins
Course Breakfast
Cuisine French
Servings 2

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Beat eggs gently in a small bowl. Try to avoid making air bubbles.
    Four egg yolks sitting in eggs whites in a small bowl.
  • Pour egg mixture into a non-stick pan (do NOT preheat the pan). Add 1 Tablespoon cold butter.
    Eggs that have been beaten and poured into a pan. A pat of cold butter is sitting over the top of the beaten eggs.
  • Turn heat to medium-high. Using a rubber spatula, stir constantly until butter melts and curds begin to form. Remove from heat and continue stirring until soft curds begin to form. You can return the pan to the heat for a few seconds at a time to continue cooking curds if needed. You want soft, creamy eggs. Do not over cook.
    Eggs being heated in a pan and turning into curds for scrambled eggs.
  • Season with salt and pepper after the soft curds have formed. Fold in creme fraiche until eggs are lightly coated. Garnish with green onion (optional) and serve immediately.
    A top view of scrambled eggs in a pan sitting on a counter.

Nutrition Information

Calories: 193kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 13gFat: 15gSaturated Fat: 7gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 387mgSodium: 192mgPotassium: 140mgSugar: 1gVitamin A: 715IUCalcium: 58mgIron: 2mg

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About the author

Erica Walker

Erica lives in Boise, Idaho with her husband, Jared, an attorney, and her beautiful three girls. Beyond the world of recipes, she loves adventuring with everything from kayaking, to cruising, to snowboarding and taking the family along for the thrill ride.

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